MKB 18 – Knitted Insertion (Pattern)

The pattern for a Knitted Insertion is found on Page 32 of Miss Lambert’s My Knitting Book (1843, first series).  The pattern is short and sweet, easy to memorize and makes for great conversation knitting.  Below, I have provided my interpretation of this 173-year-old pattern.

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Description

The pattern is for a piece of lace that can be sewn onto curtains, into a table cloth etc.  The lace is quite plain and reversible.

Size

Width x Length = 1″/2.5cm x desired length

Materials

Yarn:  DK cotton (sample knit using Patons Grace DK in the colour Aquifer) (amount required depends on the length of lace required).

Needles:  4.0mm (or size needed to obtain gauge).

Other Materials:  Tapestry needle.

Gauge (in pattern):  9 sts x 8 rows = 1inch (2.5cm) x 1inch (2.5cm)

Terminology

Sl – Slip

K – Knit

P – Purl

K2tog – Knit two stitches together

Yf – Yarn forward

Directions

Cast on nine stitches.

Row 1:  Sl1, k2, yf, k2tog, k1, yf, k2tog, p1.

Every row is the same.

Continue until the lace is the desired length.

Wash, block and enjoy a taste of 1843 in your home décor!

Note:  The original pattern calls for fine lace weight cotton and finer needles, I imagine that this lace would look great in any weight of yarn, so long as you change the needle size accordingly!

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MKB No. 18 – A Knitted Insertion (Complete)

I am happy to say that I have finished the Knitted Insertion from Miss Lambert’s My Knitting Book (1843, First Series).  I knit the pattern using Patons Grace, 100% Cotton in DK weight and colour Aquifer.  I am really pleased with how it turned out!

My sample is about 15 inches long and 1 inch wide.  What I particularly like about the pattern is its simplicity and that it is reversible, looking equally pretty from both sides.

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I can imagine that the insertion would look quite delicate in a fine lace weight cotton and would make a beautiful addition to a curtain or other sewn object!

In the DK weight and the right colour, this would make a very nice extension for a summer t-shirt or skirt or a nice headband for a little girl.   It could also make a nice trim for the end of a scarf or be used to join two ends of a cowl together.  In fact, I may just have to knit some up in bright colours and add to my pillow cases for a modern-Victorian effect like this:

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Write up in modern knitting language to follow soon!

 

 

 

MKB 17 – Knitted Lace (Nope!)

So, apparently, if I’m not knitting, I have absolutely no incentive to blog!  In the past week or so, I’ve been getting slowly back into knitting as my shoulder is on the mend.  I am only doing a few rows at a time, and far less knitting than I usually do, but I am happy to be back at it.

That said, I have tried my best to figure out Miss Lambert’s pattern for Knitted Lace – there is some kind of error in the pattern and I can’t see it for the life of me.  I have knit up the pattern several times trying different modifications and I have charted it as well, without any luck at all.  I can’t see any pattern repetition, there seems to be no rhyme or reason to the pattern and I can’t “read” what is happening in the work.  This may be in part due to my limited experience with lacework, especially lacework that is worked on the return row.  So, Miss Lambert, I am throwing in the towel on this one.  I give up.  I cannot figure this out and I am going to let go and move on.

 

 

If you are interested in giving this a try yourself, I have reproduced the pattern for Knitted Lace from Miss Lambert’s My Knitting Book (First Series, 1843, pp31-32) below:

Cast on twelve stitches with very fine cotton, or thread.—No. 25 needles.

First row—slip one; knit two; pearl one; knit two together; turn the thread once round the needle, knit two; pearl one; knit one; turn the thread once round the needle, knit two, taken together at the back.

Second row—slip one; knit one; turn the thread twice round the needle, knit two; pearl two together; turn the thread once round the needle, knit one; pearl two together; turn the thread twice round the needle, pearl two together; knit one.

Third row—slip one; knit two; pearl one; knit two; turn the thread once round the needle, knit two together, taken at the back; knit one; knit two together; knit three.

Fourth row—slip one; turn the thread once round the needle; pearl one; knit two together; turn the thread once round the needle, knit four; pearl two together; turn the thread twice round the needle, pearl two together; knit one.[31]

Fifth row—slip one; knit two; pearl one; knit two; knit two together; turn the thread twice round the needle, knit three; pearl two together; knit one.

Sixth row—slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; slip one; knit one, pass the slip-stitch over it; slip one; knit two; turn the thread once round the needle, pearl two together; turn the thread once round the needle, pearl two together; knit one; turn the thread twice round the needle, pearl two together; knit one.

There should now be twelve stitches on the needle as at the commencement.—Repeat from the first row.

Be sure to let me know how it goes!!!